Review – Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

POSTED ON September 12, 2014 BY Tia Jenkins IN Book Review

Review – Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Jane Eyre

by Charlotte Bronte
Published on February 4, 2003 by Penguin
Genres: Classic, Fiction, Historical, Historical Romance
Pages: 507
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
Rating:
Book Depository / Amazon / Barnes & Noble
GOODREADS

Orphaned into the household of her Aunt Reed at Gateshead and subject to the cruel regime at Lowood charity school, Jane Eyre nonetheless emerges unbroken in spirit and integrity. She takes up the post of governess at Thornfield, falls in love with Mr. Rochester, and discovers the impediment to their lawful marriage in a story that transcends melodrama to portray a woman's passionate search for a wider and richer life than Victorian society traditionally allowed.

With a heroine full of yearning, the dangerous secrets she encounters, and the choices she finally makes, Charlotte Bronte's innovative and enduring romantic novel continues to engage and provoke readers.


I had to read this book for school, and normally when you get assigned a book to read in class, it sucks epically. But that can’t be said for Jane Eyre. I actually enjoyed this book a lot. It was different from the other classics we’ve had to read before. Bronte’s writing is easy to follow and doesn’t have the unnecessarily posh writing that most classics seem to have. It was also easy to relate to. I could easily see myself in Jane’s position. For me, Jane Eyre has become my favorite classic along with How to Kill a Mockingbird.

Now to the actual story xD

So in the beginning Bronte starts off with Jane as a 10 year old girl. I always like reading books that the characters grow up through out the story. I think it makes it more interesting and realistic. Jane is an orphan living with her Aunt Reed. Her childhood isn’t the best one out there. You see, her uncle died and made her aunt promise to take care of little Jane. That only made her aunt resent her even more.

Little Jane had it rough…and it got sort of worse. Not wanting to take care of Jane anymore, Aunt Reed sent her to school at Lowood. Lowood was basically a school of orphans. It was there that Jane met Helen. Before becoming friends with Helen, Jane felt anger towards everyone. It was Helen and Miss Temple’s kindness and pure hearts that changed her way of thinking.

After 8 years, 6 as a student and 2 as a teacher, at Lowood, Jane set off to find something better to do with her life. She finds it at a place called Thornfield. It’s at Thornfield that she meets Rochester.

Rochester….what can I say about him? When Jane first meets him all I can think is that he’s an arrogant ass that needs to be put in his place. And I was right. Jane was the one to check him when he seemed to get out of line and you could tell that he was changing because of her. He began sharing things with her that he hadn’t shared with others. You could see the bond between them forming and I knew it was only a matter of time before they ended up together. Or so I thought.

First it was Blanche Ingram that put a damper on their relationship. Then it was a secret that Rochester had kept from everyone who lived at Lowood, except for a few people. Nothing seemed to be going right and so…Jane left. She was homeless and nearly starving when she finally stumbled onto a place that took her in.

It was a complete coincidence that the people who took her in were her cousins. She had gone under the name Jane Elliot but then St John, one of the people who lived in the house and the one who found her a teaching job, figured out that her last name was really Eyre. Jane stayed with her family for awhile but eventually went back to Thornfield to see how everyone was.

The ending was a happy ending, but to find out what exactly happened to everyone, you’ll have to read for yourself >:D


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